Kulin Oval case study

A permanent wastewater recycling scheme has been constructed for the Shire of Kulin to provide a climate resilient water source for future irrigation of the town’s oval.

100

% wastewater recycled

440

K spent on project

15

million litres per year

How can you do this?

Why we acted

Kulin is a small town of 350 people located approximately 280km south-east of Perth. Like many towns in the area, it has been heavily affected by our drying climate in recent years. This has reduced the amount of stormwater available to irrigate the town’s oval.

Maintaining a green oval is very important to the amenity of this close knit community. Shire of Kulin Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Greg Hadlow said the town oval died in 2010 due to lack of available water.

In the exceptionally dry summer of 2011, we provided the Shire with a small amount of treated wastewater to irrigate the oval. This supplemented the dwindling stormwater source that was usually used for irrigation.

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How we did it

Diagram showing the permanent wastewater recycling scheme in Kulin

We worked collaboratively with the Shire of Kulin to develop this recycling scheme with the end use of irrigating a public open space. We installed a disinfection unit at the Kulin wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and the Shire built a pipeline to transfer the recycled water to tanks at the oval.

To obtain Department of Health approval for the scheme, our staff worked closely with the Shire’s Environmental Health Officer to complete comprehensive documentation and testing at the Kulin WWTP and the Shire’s tank to verify the quality of the recycled water.

What we are doing now

The new recycling scheme provides a permanent supply of treated wastewater for community benefit, while reducing demand on precious drinking water.  

The treated wastewater will be tested regularly to ensure it meets quality standards set by the Department of Health. 

The Great Southern region, where Kulin is located, recycles around 90% of wastewater - the highest proportion of any region in Western Australia!

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